Rightpet

Bambi

Netherland Dwarf Rabbit

Overall satisfaction

5/5

Acquired: Other

Gender: Female

Appearance

5/5

Friendly

3/5

Easy to handle

3/5

Activity level

3/5

Visibility

5/5

Health

5/5

Meat production

3/5

Fiber quality

3/5

A New Kind of Pet

By

United States

Posted Feb 28, 2014

As a fourth-grade teacher, I was delighted when one of the grandparents of my student asked if I would be interested in keeping a dwarf rabbit. When I first met Bambi I thought she reminded me of a seal point Siamese cat with her markings. I found out later that she was indeed a seal point dwarf Netherland rabbit. She was beautiful!

I went to a pet store and found a suitable mate thinking it would be a great experience for my students to help raise baby rabbits. It sure didn't take very long for Bambi and Thumper to mate. We were thrilled to know that it we would soon be the proud parents of baby rabbits.

As we studied about our rabbits, we learned that Bambi would make a soft nest with the fur from her belly for her baby kits. We also learned that they would be born bald, having no fur at first. From our information we learned how important it was to leave Bambi and the kits alone because if she felt threatened at all, she would eat them. My students were shocked that this, but I told them it was her natural defense. We had to keep Thumper in a separate cage away from them until they were a little older.

Since Thumper was not a seal point, but was a solid smoky gray color dwarf rabbit, the kits were a beautiful gray and white seal point. Bambi was a dark brown and very light tan color.

As we watched our babies grow, and as the temperatures rose in Southern California, we realize the importance of keeping a freshwater supply to them. With a rabbit's high metabolism, they need plenty of water to stay hydrated. At recess time our rabbits were the highlight of the play time. Our school had an enclosed grassy courtyard that was perfect for turning our little protégés loose.

It was a good thing, because those little critters really knew how to take off running; especially if they got excited. We really got a kick out of the fact that as they were running, they would leap into the air as if to click their back feet together.

Sometimes during the day, we allowed Bambi and Thumper to roam free in our classroom during study time. It was interesting to note that they never had an accident during this time. It was as though they knew it was not allowed. We also learned that rabbits are very clean animals and they clean their fur much like a cat.

As with the baby chicks and ducks, we had no problem finding good homes for our baby kits.

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