Rightpet

Fancy Mouse - Standard

Overall satisfaction

2/5

Acquired: Other

Gender: N/A

Appearance

1/5

Friendly

4/5

Easy to handle

4/5

Activity level

4/5

Visibility

3/5

Health

3/5

Easy to clean and maintain habitat

1/5

Easy to feed

4/5

Easy to provide habitat

3/5

M is for Messy Mice

By

United States

Posted Feb 23, 2015

Years ago, we inherited five white mice from the man who had the apartment before us. He fed them to his boa constrictor who had escaped. The entire time we lived in that apartment, we kept an eye out for that snake! The mice lived in a small wire cage with an exercise wheel that they absolutely loved to run on. That wheel squeaked like crazy, but the mice were very quiet otherwise. They were relatively clean in terms of personal hygiene but had a bad habit of flinging their bedding materials out of the cage. Sometimes they emptied the entire contents of their cage onto the floor. Because of this, we finally bought a cage with deep “walls” to minimize the mess. We tried to keep their cage clean because they went to the bathroom in their bedding, and it could get a little smelly. We used straw and shredded newspapers for the bedding material.

The positive side of mice is that they are a lot of fun to play with. They ran up and down our arms or across our backs. They loved to run around the kitchen floor. We blocked off the gaps around appliances though because mice can squeeze into very small holes. My brother built an elaborate multi-level fun house for them out of PVC pipes. We could hear them running in the pipes but couldn’t see them so my brother cut out sections and inserted Plexiglas windows so we could watch them. He drilled more air holes after they refused to come out for hours. We were afraid they would suffocate in there.

The downside of owning mice was the constant mess they made. They ate sunflower seeds, lettuce, carrots and oats, which they flung everywhere. They also don’t live very long – about 2 years. They literally can have babies every month if you don’t separate the males from the females. We had one litter before we kept the males and females in separate cages.

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