Rightpet

Ramsey

Egyptian Spiny-tailed Lizard

Overall satisfaction

5/5

Acquired: Online breeder / seller

Gender: N/A

Appearance

4/5

Health

5/5

ActivityLevel

4/5

Temperament

4/5

Easy to provide habitat

5/5

Easy to handle

4/5

Visibility

4/5

Easy to clean and maintain habitat

0/5

Easy to Feed

0/5

Easy to provide environmental needs

0/5

Egyptian Uromastyx

By

Oklahoma, United States

Posted Dec 11, 2013

Egyptian uromastyx are probably the most hardy out of all the uromastyx. The only downside is that a lot of them are wild-caught, and can be a little skittish at first. But with some time and patience they will turn around. When we first got Ramsey he would take off anytime we got anywhere near the tank or just within his sight, and now he gets taken out for belly rubs. He loves getting his belly rubbed! Egyptians are pretty much vegetarians, unlike some of the other uromastyx breeds that will eat some protein occasionally. He may have eaten one or two wax worms, but is happy with his greens every day, so he is easy to keep. He gets along with other uromastyx that are the same size but different breeds from him, and currently his best friend is our little bearded dragon Ember, who is about the same size and age as him currently. The major concern with husbandry with Egyptians (and all uros, really) is the heat. They need it really hot, like 130 degrees F hot. Now that he's gotten used to us, he is more active around the tank and doesn't hide until he wants to sleep. He does like to dig, so if you want to keep them on something simple like paper towels, be prepared for a lot of shredding. I've found that once he got a little bit bigger he does well on coconut fiber. Since he's not eating off of the ground I am not worried about impaction, and even if he did eat some of it, it's digestible. And he loves to dig in it. Egyptians get very large as they get older though, so be prepared to get a large tank. And since they are so hardy they are not as delicate as some of the other breeds of uromastyx, so be prepared for them to live 15 years or so, if they're taken care of properly.

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