Rightpet

Toothless

Bearded Pygmy Chameleon

Overall satisfaction

4/5

Acquired: Rescue / shelter organization

Gender: N/A

Appearance

3/5

Health

3/5

ActivityLevel

3/5

Temperament

3/5

Easy to provide habitat

3/5

Easy to handle

4/5

Visibility

3/5

Easy to clean and maintain habitat

3/5

Easy to Feed

3/5

Easy to provide environmental needs

4/5

Toothless the Chameleon

By

64735, Sweden

Posted Jul 16, 2014

Although i like pets, all sorts, sizes and shapes I never had someone so exotic until I had toothless. We found him in Africa during our stay there, he was injured so we took him. I was thinking that he is going to die but he recovered very quickly. For us, we did not have anything specific for him so the first few days of his life, he spent in a box. Than a friend of mine managed to find us an old used aquarium and we converted it for his habitat.

It was a fun thing, since my knowledge of reptiles before him was absolutely zero, so it was both exciting and a bit challenging. A feeling which i still relish. I am assuming he never understood that we were his owners, you would look at his face and he always looked disinterested. Both eyes looking in different directions, sitting motionless, absolutely paying no attention to you what so ever but still, existing and very much getting a lot of attention from you.

The feeding was initially a problem, since it was difficult and also he was injured a bit badly but later the problem became less. They are happy eaters and they will eat anything that is provided to them, we even tried mashed potatoes with some mayo on them and he ate it, albeit I am not so sure that he really enjoyed it but he definitely ate it.

If you have kids and they are interested in reptiles, lizards etc, they are actually a very good bet to have. They need care, cleaning and feeding should be regular, but they are not like cats or dogs who require a lot of attention. Your kids will learn to love them over the passage of time and that is the purpose of having a pet.

When we were leaving, we let him go, it was not the happiest thing to do. I wanted to get him back with us, despite the fact that he never did anything exciting, he still felt pretty much part of the family. In the end, we would call him and one of his eyes would come looking where he was being called for, not sure what it meant but i guess our bothering finally got an acknowledgment.

A nice pet to have, takes time to like them but they steadily grow on you. You can carry them around in your palms and put them outside where insects are (in a closed box). Not sure how long he lived after we left and had no idea how old he was when we got him. A very nice memory of a very nice friend

2 members found this helpful