Rightpet

Indian Peafowl

Overall satisfaction

4/5

Acquired: Other

Gender: Female

Appearance

4/5

Temperament

4/5

Health

4/5

Easy to feed

5/5

Foraging ability

4/5

Easy to provide habitat

4/5

Meat quality

N/A

Egg quantity

N/A

Very interesting Bird

By

Plantersville, Texas, United States

Posted Jan 13, 2019

I've met a few of these in person and cared for them, but I have never owned one myself. From my experience, they are mostly standoffish and prefer to keep to themselves without contact. They aren't afraid to get in your face though, if they have to, and will run you down if you pose a threat to their family. These birds can fly a short distance very well, but typically stay on your property with no interest of leaving. Very much like a larger, more beautiful chicken. These birds are super eye-catching, even as females, and will make you the talk of the town. I've even witnessed people slow down to check them out as they were driving by. These are not birds you can cuddle with and should be treated more like livestock than pets as their personalities typically keep them at a distance despite their upbrining and are happiest when free-roaming the property. They are super easy to feed, much like a chicken, and you only have to spread their feed over the ground for them to forage on. They are, however, not afraid to get into things and love to try and steal your horse's or goat's food when they can. The peafowl I have met have been typically very healthy and not required much, if any at all, vet visits for sicknesses. These birds, however, should not be kept by first-time bird owners and anyone looking to get some should do some extensive research before taking them on. They are a joy to be around and watch though, but their calls can be super loud, sometimes much louder than a rooster. They are typically very good with most other animals including friendly dogs. I would recommend these to anyone experienced in caring for birds and suggest getting them as chicks so they can properly realize where their home is and where their food comes from.

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