Rightpet

Derbyshire Redcap Chicken

Overall satisfaction

4/5

Acquired: Other

Gender: Female

Appearance

3/5

Temperament

3/5

Tolerance for heat

3/5

Tolerance for cold

3/5

Meat quantity

N/A

Egg quantity

5/5

A look at my partners' Derbyshire Redcap Chickens

By

United Kingdom

Posted Feb 20, 2013

I'm writing this review about my partners' Grandfathers' Chickens. My partner and her family live with her grandparents on a large plot of land, and as her grandfather is now retired, he likes hobbies to keep himself busy and entertained. A few years ago he built a very large chicken enclosure on their land and he now owns around 42 Derbyshire redcap Chickens. He uses the Chickens mainly as a source of income by selling their delicious and fully freerange eggs every day. Every day he collects around 40 eggs on average and they're nearly always all sold before the day has ended. People around the village absolutely adore the eggs and so do I for that matter.
The difference between so called super market free-range eggs and these eggs is astonishing, and the terrible excuses for eggs being mass produced by battery hens don't even get a look in, and rightfully so.
Battery hens and battery hen laid eggs should be banned in my opinion and I'm hopeful that now people are starting to wake up to the fact that because battery eggs, and meat for that matter, tastes like cardboard, we'll slowly start to see battery hens being phased out and replaced with more organic free-range options.
Anyways, back to the Derbyshire redcaps. The chickens will eat anything, and they sometimes find themselves fortunate enough to be fed leftover fruit, veg, pasta and rice. This, in my opinion, really helps to make the eggs taste so delicious.
The cost of food and other materials for the chickens works out at around £30 ($45) every two weeks, whilst the eggs generate an income of around £40 ($61) per week. This leaves around £100 ($153) profit every month.
The chickens require minimal attention, although they do need securely locking in their hen coops every night to protect them from predators, and releasing again in the morning. You'll often find that as soon as dusk falls, Chickens take themselves to bed, so if you wish to purchase a remote control locking mechanism you wouldn't even need to leave the house in order to lock them away and release them the next day.
The chickens are extremely inquisitive, dim, and fearless and can also actually make quite loving pets.
If anybody reading this review is thinking about keeping Chickens then you must ensure that you have enough land to house them safely and humanely.
You also need to purchase, or build, a secure hen coop complete with nesting boxes in order for them to lay their eggs.
Overall the chickens are a very welcome part of my partners' family, generating a decent amount of cash with minimal effort, and I often look forward to visiting them to feed them any leftover fruit and veg from the night before.

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