Rightpet

Bus

Cotswold Sheep

Overall satisfaction

3.75/5

Acquired: Bred animal myself

Gender: Female

Appearance

3/5

Temperament

5/5

Tolerance for heat

3/5

Tolerance for cold

5/5

Meat production

4/5

Milk production

N/A

Fleece quality

5/5

Commercial value

3/5

Cotswold - a good breed for fiber and meat

By

Canada

Posted May 17, 2014

I have raised 6 purebred Cotswolds, and multiple cross bred lambs from them. The Cotswold has a long lock, luster fleece which is exceptional for dyeing and hand-spinning. Due to the relative coarseness of the fleece it is better for rugs, heavy blankets, and slippers or socks.The long fiber length and coarseness also increases durability compared to the finer and shorter fleeced sheep breeds.

Bus has her name for a reason, she looks like a fridge on legs and if she wants to go past you she will. When she was a yearling, the shearer wanted her to go the opposite direction she wanted to go - and sat on her back. She didn't even notice and just kept going her own way, much to the shearer's annoyance and surprise. Bus has improved since then, and often nearly knocks me down to get attention, or a handful of grain.

Cotswold are slow growing, but reach a good market size at about 5-6 months. Due to the slower maturation, a Cotswold lamb of up to two years will not taste like mutton. Of the Cotswold's I have raised, only one ewe averaged singles, the other ewes have averaged twins. The Cotswold ewes have good mothering instinct and rarely lose their lambs.

1 member found this helpful