Rightpet

Cinta Senese Pig

Overall satisfaction

5/5

Acquired: Bred animal myself

Gender: Both

Appearance

4/5

Temperament

3/5

Health

5/5

Foraging ability

5/5

Tolerance for heat

5/5

Tolerance for cold

4/5

Meat quality

3/5

Commercial value

5/5

Ideal to make premium, expensive cold cuts

By

13084000, Brazil

Posted Jul 24, 2014

Out of Tuscany few people have heard of the Cinta Senese. The Tuscan pig is a subspecies that produces exceptional cold cuts. Since ancient times the animals breed, medium sized, run loose by the Tuscan woods. The Italian immigrants brought this pig to Brazil in the late XIX century, but they soon traded them for sturdier, native pigs. The Germans took the production in the beginning of the XX century, and to this day a few cold cuts brands are made almost exclusively with the Cinta Senese meat, mostly under control of German families in Brazil.

The cold cuts made of Cinta Senese meat are not for every palate. The taste is rustic and the smell is stronger. Also, the meat is tougher, because the fat is not streaky, meat is meat, fat is fat, it doesn’t mix. Moreover, they are traditionally kept free roaming, and that makes the meat even harder. It’s not the best pig to roast, mostly because of this. They are not adequate to be kept in intensive, concentrated production farms. Since this breed wasn’t genetically manipulated, their production of meat won’t reach the same amount of other breeds, especially because of their medium built frame (around 300 pounds after 24 months). Not to mention the fact that they don’t do well eating industrialized foods. It’s not a proper pig for those who want to sell their meat for immediate consumption, and even the cold cuts made of Cinta Senese’s meat won’t find an easy market, since they will cost up to 3 times the price of other regular “fiambres”. They are recommended for those who want to produce special cold cuts for a specific, premium market.

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