Rightpet

Poppy

Boer Goat

Overall satisfaction

3/5

Acquired: Bred animal myself

Gender: Female

Appearance

5/5

Temperament

3/5

Easy to provide habitat

3/5

Health

4/5

Tolerance for heat

3/5

Tolerance for cold

3/5

Meat production

3/5

Milk production

3/5

Fiber quality

3/5

Commercial value

4/5

Goats are commercially viable as backyard farm.

By

9023, Philippines

Posted Sep 30, 2012

Goats commercially are viable raised as backyard farm; the surplus from my children’s’ pet gifts from grandpa’s farm. Begging to take home baby goats or kids my two young sons brought home with them two kid goats. Their grandpa gave them a female and male goat. As goats grow big and mature they lost their cute appeal to my two young sons’ eyes. They are faced by the reality that grown goats are stubborn and sometimes will gore you with their horns. Fortunately only the male goat has horns. Now the chore of raising the goat was transferred to my hands. But I kind of like it so I’m sharing this with you.
Raising goats just need your patience, hard work and a wide space of grassland to pasture them, if they are many of course. You have to spend some amount building a shed as their resting place come nighttime and during rainy days. Goats don’t like getting wet. They get sick when exposed to rain for long periods. In the shed you have to make some elevated floor for them to lie on. They may get bitten by insects when you let them just lie on the earth flooring of the shed.
You have to put them to pasture in the morning when the grass dews have already dried. We tie our goats to avoid them making a go at some of our neighbor’s backyard garden. They hate stepping on wet grasses. Pasturing them you have to take care they are not exposed to the high heat of the sun during high noon. This will weaken them. You have to transfer them where they could be shielded from direct sun’s heat. Like under some trees and bushes. Then you let them drink water from a pail for they get thirsty too during extreme high temperatures. You have to take them in to their shed when rain has started to pour down heavily.
In the afternoon if it does not rain early and you have to put them in their shed you have to pasture them out to new a new part in the pasture. They do not like to eat from the same place all throughout the day. They need to eat at the least 7 kinds of grasses in one pasture day to get their fill and make them healthy and fat.
Thin goats fetch very low prices when sold to butchers for meat. Thin goats’ meat emits some kind of foul odor when cooked. Butchers don’t like to slaughter thin goats for meat. They are going to fatten them up first hence the inexpensive price. But fat goats’ meat smells heavenly for those who love to eat goats’ meat. They are loved for their nutritive value unlike red meat from beef and pork that may give us some bad nutrition. One purpose also of making them lies on elevated wooden or bamboo flooring is to prevent their meat from emitting that foul odor when they lie on earthen floor.
In their shed you need to hang a wooden sack full of salt for them to lick. Near the salt sack you need to put a pail of water because they sip water after licking the salt sack. After weaning you can sell the goats when they weight at the least 25 kilos for them to fetch a good price. We don’t eat goats’ meat but we raised them for their commerciality value.
After almost seven months of good pasturing you can sell your goat for a price. What you initially cashed out is the cost of the shed and for the mother and father goat the BUCK. Mine is minus the cost of the couple mama and papa goat for they came as gifts.

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