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Arapawa Goat

Overall satisfaction

4/5

Acquired: Breeder (non-professional, hobby breeder),
Breeder,
Bred animal myself

Gender: Both

Appearance

5/5

Temperament

3/5

Easy to provide habitat

3/5

Health

5/5

Tolerance for heat

4/5

Tolerance for cold

4/5

Meat production

N/A

Milk production

2/5

Fiber quality

N/A

Commercial value

3/5

arapawa goats

By

Kent, United Kingdom

Posted Aug 25, 2011

the arapawa goat, is a unique breed of goat, a feral breed of goat believed to originate from an old english goat (milch goat), they first arrived in new zealand in the 1700,s, the first goats landed on 2-3 febuary 1773 introduced by captain james cook, although goats could have been released as early as 1768.
the arapawa goat of new zealand would have became extinct if it was not for the efforts of the late betty rowe, these feral goats were destined for a complete cull, as they was seen as a threat to other wildlife and fauna, in 2004 the first arapawa goats arrived in the uk, from these first six arrivals, the uk now has around 50, distributed between a handful of enthusiasts.
female arapawa goats produce around 1 litre of milk, they can be milked by hand, new keepers may find this a bit difficult as there teats are smaller than the comercial breeds, they kid easily and are excellent mothers, older animals are a bit nervous, as with all animals the more time you spend with them the better they are to handle, diet :- these goats prefer to browse rather than graze and will eat a variety of leaves and shrubs, willing eat concentrated or commercially produced feed for goats, during the winter months addional feed and hay will be required.
housing :- these goats live happily outside all year round, a field shelter or stable should be erected for severe weather, and draught free, good husbandry is the key to healthy and happy animals, our goats are fenced in paddocks, using tradional stock fencing 5 feet high, the arapawa goat is capable of jumping 2 metres in height,
over all these goats are easy to keep, but not for the newcomer into goat keeping, if purchased or aquired at an early age they become very tame and trusting, while older specimens being slightly nervous but not flighty, care should be taken with bucks (males) as they have large horns, compared to the does (females) have shorter horns.

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