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Colored Angoras

Angora Goat

Overall satisfaction

4/5

Acquired: Breeder

Gender: Both

Appearance

5/5

Temperament

5/5

Easy to provide habitat

3/5

Health

3/5

Tolerance for heat

3/5

Tolerance for cold

4/5

Meat production

N/A

Milk production

N/A

Fiber quality

5/5

Commercial value

4/5

Colored Angoras in Michigan

By

Posted Jun 11, 2011

My wife became interested in spinning and we have acreage that needs trimming. So when 4 Angoras showed up on Craig's List (with a bonus Alpaca Guard) we bought them and started a steep learning process. We now have over 50.
Angoras in a wet state like Michigan are very susceptible to worms. Get with a local vet or experienced goat breeder to see what wormers are effective in your area. Lice can also be a problem and the long coats make topical application problematic. There are several treatements available.
Small goats are targets for carnivores. The worst being your own pooch or the neighbors. Keep them close and inside good fences until they are 6 months old and do "not" dehorn them. They need their horns for "air conditioning" and defense. They also make good handles.
Adult intact males stink, get ornery, and develop other embarrassing habits during the rut. They have impressive horns and are not afraid to use them. Not for children or even slow moving adults. Keep them afraid of you. They head butt their friends. Major fencing is required to contain these guys during rut. Rut is same as Deer/Antelope season. When camo goes on display @ WalMart, it's time to separate bucks from any does you don't want bred with a least 2 fences.
Maverick is our herd sire, see photo. He weighs about 200 lbs and is quite friendly most of the year. He likes to remove the paint from anything in his reach by sharpening his horns on it. Do not leave tractors, trailers, cars, trucks, in a goat pen. They will chew off the wiring (love the taste of copper), break the lights, stand on the hood/roof/trunk/seat, and spear (horn) fight the steering wheel.
Enough warnings; Angora goats can be very friendly, gentle, and lovely to watch. They are curious about everything and a joy to spend time with.
Do not milk an Angora except to immediately feed their own baby. They are for fiber, not milk.
We had no birthing issues, but very young does may have too small and weak kids.

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