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Angora Goat

Overall satisfaction

2.5/5

Acquired: Breeder (non-professional, hobby breeder)

Gender: Both

Appearance

1/5

Temperament

4/5

Health

4/5

Easy to provide habitat

2/5

Tolerance for heat

2/5

Tolerance for cold

4/5

Meat production

N/A

Milk production

N/A

Fiber quality

4/5

Commercial value

N/A

So docile it's hard to believe they are goats

By

United States

Posted Mar 24, 2015

I’ve raised four full Angora goats and have to say that they have the sweetest and most gentle personalities of all the goats I’ve ever raised. Many of my goats had issues of dominance, boredom that lead to escape attempts, and generally independent attitudes. Angoras are so much calmer and easy going. The first pair I bought had been someone’s pets. Ma was the oldest and had been treated to butterscotch candies by one of the owners. Anytime she head plastic crinkle she appeared from thin air and stood there patiently, with big eyes, and waited until you shared. She came with a younger wether called William. William was also sweet and gentle, but he hadn’t been handled much and so he had a degree of skittishness that never really left. Ma and William were about the same size as our LaMancha does, but the next Angoras we bought, Capella and Colca, were small. They stood probably about halfway between a Pygmy and a LaMancha and were much daintier than Ma or William.

All of our Angoras produced the softest mohair that was wonderful to work with. My Mom was into spinning and weaving and used their mohair to create shirts, yarn that turned into hats and scarves, and fine thread. Summers in Texas were hard for them, especially when we had a long drought and temperatures skyrocketed, so we took care to make sure they had shade, access to plenty of water, and cross breezes.

While I hate sheering and working with mohair, I had no trouble from them in any aspect, really. They were content to follow us around while hiking and were easy to catch, load, and put into the milk stand for sheering. Health-wise the biggest problems were correcting nutritional deficiencies that affected two separate births and diarrhea when they ate too many grape leaves. If you want to work with the mohair and want a goat that has a tame disposition, the Angora would be an excellent choice, especially for a beginner.

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