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Poodlers

Angora Goat

Overall satisfaction

4/5

Acquired: Bred animal myself

Gender: Both

Appearance

5/5

Temperament

5/5

Easy to provide habitat

4/5

Health

3/5

Tolerance for heat

3/5

Tolerance for cold

5/5

Meat production

N/A

Milk production

N/A

Fiber quality

5/5

Commercial value

3/5

The Goat in Sheep's Clothing

By

United States

Posted Oct 08, 2009

"What's that sheep doing in your goat field?"

If you have Angoras be prepared for that question very often.
Most people can't tell a sheep a from a goat anyway, but when the goat has a long, curly coat, identification is almost impossible.

I saw my first Angora on television (a beautiful kid!!!), and as I'm a hand-spinner, I decided to find some. Our Angoras come from a commercial Angora farm in Oklahoma. Most of ours are bottle-babies who were the owner's "pets" and either didn't grow out enough to be part of the commercial herd or were older does that hadn't produced a chamption kid.

Our Angoras are gentle, quiet goats (this might not be true of all Angoras). They are sedate and don't tend to climb and jump like the milk goats. They love attention.  Even our bucks have been very gentle, although I know that not all Angora bucks are so friendly.

Pros:
Beautiful fiber
ADORABLE kids...these aren't called "Angel Goats" for nothing.
Quiet temperament (in the ones I've had)

Cons:
They have to be sheared. The mohair is very tough and will dull your shears, clippers or scissors quickly.

Ours have been a little more delicate than the milk goats. They need de-worming more often, and the kids don't seem to be as hardy. Angoras also have to be de-loused often. Their mohair just seems to attract goat-lice.
They don't usually look pretty and white. My girls like to get dirty.

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