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Buffy and 21 more

Angora Goat

Overall satisfaction

5/5

Acquired: Breeder,
Bred animal myself

Gender: Both

Appearance

5/5

Temperament

5/5

Easy to provide habitat

4/5

Health

4/5

Tolerance for heat

4/5

Tolerance for cold

4/5

Meat production

3/5

Milk production

3/5

Fiber quality

5/5

Commercial value

5/5

Colored angora goats CAGBA

By

Keller, Texas, United States

Posted Nov 02, 2009

              
    Roman, Christian and I moved back to Fla from England,to be near my family. I took a two year course in Ultrasound, my official job. My husband was offered a job in Tx and we moved to Southlake. I love it here, our home was too big so we bought a bit of property and a nice home in Keller right after I was diagnosed with MS,  Sept. 2006.
            My life  has  changed dramatically.  I had always wanted a farm so my sweet husband encouraged my dream. I decided on goats.
So here we went... I wanted to make goats cheese and soaps and such so  was thinking dairy goats. My husband then said to me, you do realize that they have to be milked twice a day everyday. OK a little to much labor involved and no holidays, as if!!
Then I looked at meat goats. There is such a high demand from the Hispanic and Muslim populations its a good money maker. So here goes the hubbie again, do you really think you are going to be able to take your goats, that you birthed to be butchered. At that point no, now yes. But things change.
          So what other goats are out there? If I  have something it has to serve a purpose.
Fiber goats, I did some research on the internet and looked at cashmere, which are more flighty, and the Colored Angora goats. The Angoras won hand down, and went I went to see a show, and the goats were being dragged around the ring, I said I can do better then that. So I went with Colored Angora goats.  Angoras produce Mohair, they have the cutest babies ever, and once a year. Very Predictable and helpful. The kids look just like poodles with their curly locks. These goats all have registrations and pedigrees, like dogs and cats.
    I knew nothing of farming but I found that people are so nice, and helpful.  I have taught myself, with the help of books and the internet as well, how to hand and machine shear the goats, clean the fiber, process it for spinning, spin the yarn and then figure out what it should be. All the mohair colors are natural, no dyes! And I know which fiber came off of which animal.
    Shearing was a trip, to say the least. I borrowed a pair of sheep shears, (I still use them), from this great guy down the road. Downloaded a diagram of shearing a goat, with arrows. Now I want you to remember I have never even seen an animal sheared, none, and here I go. And you know what it was not that bad. Come on down I'll teach you. I then went and watched a pro and got a lot of hints but I can't tie my babies feet together. These goats are sheared twice a year.
Hoof trimming, another manual. Birthing was great, the moms are pretty self sufficinat, but I do like to separate them and keep an eye out. I have been present for the births of all but two of my kids.
These goats have horns for a reason and that is heat exchange, I want you to put that mohair coat on and try to cool yourself off.
These goats are VERY docile, very easy to handle, if handled from a young age and are great to show.
Biggest down side is you do have to shear them twice a year, so watch the cold with them. Parasites are the biggest problem, but can be easily controlled like fleas.

 
            Goats, goats, goats everywhere and ohhh how soft they are, black, brown, red, gray, spots, and stripes, cream and color carrier white, all natural just the way God intended, from the farm to the party, and no one gets hurt.

I have never eatten them but they are supposed to be good. And I let the babies have most of the milk and you can milk them but they are not going to supply you with gallons like milk goats.
         

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