Rightpet

Overall satisfaction

3.5/5

Acquired: Breeder,
Bred invertebrate myself,
Other

Gender: N/A

Appearance

3/5

Temperament

5/5

Easy to handle

5/5

Visibility

0/5

Easy to keep

5/5

Health

5/5

ActivityLevel

5/5

Red Wriggler Worm

By

United States

Posted Jun 16, 2014

The red wriggler will become your best friend if you have a lot of animal waste, and plant waste. The red wriggler will consume nearly it’s bodyweight per day in debris making them nature’s most perfect composter. I have five bins of 100 gallons that I keep my worm colonies in. I easily have tens of thousands that I’ve bred over the years. Red wrigglers perform the miracle of making the soil even more nutrient dense. They are the only creature that comes to mind that takes in biomass from one end, and what it excretes from the other end is more ecologically safe, and beneficial than what went in. A starter colony of a 1,000 will turn into 12,000 within a year’s time. This worm is excellent as supplemental feed for birds, or fish. I also use mine for fishing. Especially if I’m catching minnows, trout, or sunfish. The compost created by these little miracle workers is so nutrient dense that you will see a significant difference in your plants if you use it with them. I have hundreds of birds, and as you can imagine they produce a lot of manure. I easily shovel forty pounds of manure per week out of their cages, coops, and runs. All of this material goes into my worm bins and after a year the worms have converted it into the perfect compost.

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