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Aries

Greenbottle Blue Tarantula

Overall satisfaction

4/5

Acquired: Breeder

Gender: N/A

Appearance

5/5

Temperament

1/5

Easy to handle

1/5

Visibility

4/5

Easy to keep

4/5

Health

4/5

ActivityLevel

2/5

A Uniquely Colorful Spider

By

Fayetteville, North Carolina, United States

Posted Oct 27, 2009

Personally I find that my Green-Bottle Blue is a lot harder to care for than my Red-Knee (which is a beginner spider) mine wasn't eating for a long time (over a year) which I heard is normal but he still hasn't gained much of his weight or color back or spun any new web tents. I figured he would over time but i guess in his "weakened state" and the winter was too much on him . Anyways onto topic, for you more experienced spider collectors i guess, the Green-Bottle Blue is a very uniquely colorful spider, but like a rose, and yes the cliché, it’s got its thorns  they have some bad temperament issues in a way not so much as aggressive but they are so skittish and quick to defend themselves. My Red-Knee a very docile species takes a lot of poking and prodding before he kicks hairs but my Green-Bottle Blue (and I’m sure this goes for all Green-Bottles) immediately raises to an aggressive striking position when bothered or darts somewhere so fast you literally can barely see it move . The Green-Bottle Blue is definitely by all means a "display pet" probably owned by experienced collectors.
If you do end up wanting one though, you need the basic supplies any spider would need, a bedding of dirt (for best measures and safety I have organic potting soil) a heating pad, a shelter (broken pots, work well) and since it is semi-arboreal  I’ve added some branches (but be careful the last thing you want is to grab some foliage with pesticides on it, its better to not grab branches from outside in the first place I believe, but if you must be careful). Last of all they eat the normal diet of crickets and drink water (in a shallow dish).

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