Rightpet

Rottweiler

Overall satisfaction

3.5/5

Acquired: Breeder (hobby breeder)

Gender: Female

Training: Previous owner

Quick to learn and train

4/5

Emotionally stable

2/5

Family oriented

4/5

Child safety

4/5

Safe with small pets

4/5

Doesn’t bark a lot

3/5

Health

0/5

Easy to groom

4/5

Great watch dog

4/5

Great guard dog

3/5

Gone Too Soon

By

United States

Posted September 18, 2015

Unfortunately, my experience with my Rottweiler is sad. I learned several things from owning her and wish her life could have been better and happier. Let me start by saying I purchased my Rottweiler as an eight week old puppy. I did not do much research on reputable breeders and found a cheaper puppy. When I got her, she was absolutely adorable. Her temperament was always good, but she did have a submissive urination problem that showed up pretty early. Whenever anyone would try to pet her she would urinate.

The breeder we got the puppy from did not have any kind of contract. I now know this is a red flag. There was no health guarantee with her puppies. This also should have been a red flag. Within a year, we noticed our puppy had difficulty walking and took her to the vet. She had severe hip dysplasia in both hips. We opted for surgery on one of the hips, but the vet advised the other hip would not improve much even with surgery.

She did well after the surgery, but she continued limping and whimpering when walking. She also could not run or jump. At two years of age, the vet advised us to have her put down due to the amount of pain she was in. Even though she was always in pain, she never once showed any aggression toward anyone in our family, including children. She was so friendly.

Lessons that can be learned from this experience: do your research! Hip dysplasia is a genetic disease. A reputable breeder will not a breed a dog with hip dysplasia in the bloodline. A good breeder will also offer a health guarantee to guard against defects. The Rottweiler is an amazing breed of dog and can be great for your family! Just make sure you know where your puppy is coming from and the bloodlines from the dam and sire.

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