Rightpet

Henry

Dachshund

Overall satisfaction

3.5/5

Acquired: Other (stray, given dog by friend etc.)

Gender: Male

Training: Books

Quick to learn and train

3/5

Emotionally stable

1/5

Family oriented

2/5

Child safety

1/5

Safe with small pets

2/5

Doesn’t bark a lot

2/5

Health

3/5

Easy to groom

2/5

Great watch dog

5/5

Great guard dog

5/5

The Worst Dog Ever

By

United States

Posted April 29, 2014

Henry is my poopie doo. I adore Henry however I am alone in my feelings. In my large boisterous family Henry is hated and rightfully so. He is a long red haired Dachshund with a mission to attack anyone that moves except me and sometimes it has even been me that he has snarled at. He came to me as a rescue. An unsavory breeder abandoned his puppies when he lost his trailer. My intent was not to keep him but to re-home him before I knew it I named him and wound up keeping him.

Henry is a difficult dog. It is his breed. Dachshunds were bred to hunt Badgers which are nasty characters in their own right. Dachshunds are very ferocious little dogs because they have to be. Henry has ownership issues. He likes his personal space and does not like for anyone to get in it.

After much training and patience Henry sadly still has not learned not to bite. I am basically a hostage to Henry's whims. If he decides he does not like someone he sticks to his guns and he just never likes them and any time that person comes to the house he reminds them he does not like them.

I can not re-home him because I would simply be giving someone else a problem that I know is not curable. I can not put him down because I love him and for the most part he can be controlled if I am at home and in reach of him.

Initially I thought Henry was a Henry problem but after some research I found that it is not a Henry problem it is a Henry breed problem. It is hit or miss with the breed. Either you get that cute cuddly dog that they appear to be or you get Henry (I wanna eat your face) type of dog.

Some things that have helped with Henry's attitude is to provide him with his own "special" space. He has a crate with a bed that makes him happy. He also has a blanket a a few toys that are exclusively his.

There is something else I found out the hard way about Dachshunds. Their backs tend to go out. Their long bodies that are ideal for getting down badger holes are not so great when it comes to running and getting up and down stairs. Henry slipped a disk when he was 4 years old. The vet said (after Henry steadly tried to attack him even with a muzzle on AND being tranquilized) that he would very likely not walk again and that I should consider putting him down. Surgery is only successful if it is done in the first 24 hours after the disc slips.

I did not put him down but did have to keep him crated 24 hours a day for three weeks and had to express his bladder for him. It was an interesting three weeks but he made it and runs around and chases everyone so I guess it worked out ok.

If you are considering a Dachshund and you have small children I can tell you that it is a bad idea. They are very high strung aggressive dogs generally and they do not like kids as a rule. You may be setting yourself up for a lot of heart ache if you choose a Dachshund as a family pet. They are very loyal dogs but they are a one person dog not really a family dog.

I love Henry and he loves me it is just the rest of the world that he is not too crazy about.

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