Rightpet

Bailey

Dachshund

Overall satisfaction

5/5

Acquired: Breeder (professional)

Gender: Female

Training: I’ve taught bird care / training techniques

Quick to learn and train

5/5

Emotionally stable

5/5

Family oriented

4/5

Child safety

5/5

Safe with small pets

5/5

Doesn’t bark a lot

1/5

Health

4/5

Easy to groom

5/5

Great watch dog

4/5

Great guard dog

2/5

Dachshunds are the Best

By

United States

Posted March 14, 2015

In my experience (which is quite a bit, having grown up with ten different Dachshunds), Dachshunds are a varied breed. However, every one of them has proven to be sweet as long as they’re well-trained. The same can be said for any breed, but it’s Dachshunds I have known the most of.

Bailey, specifically, was the first Dachshund (and first dog period) I ever knew. My grandparents got her as a puppy, just a few months before I was born. We grew up right next to each other. We were attached when we were both tiny; I’ve heard plenty of stories about how she guarded me when I was taking naps, and didn’t want to let anybody near me. Once she was old, I felt that same protectiveness toward her while her health was failing. Bailey lived a long life (we were forced to put her down when we were both 18, at which point it was the kinder thing to do) and was easy to care for; the worst it ever got was when her bladder started developing problems and we had to keep an eye on her to avoid accidents in the house. She was loyal and sociable, never bit anybody no matter how annoying the somebody was (she was incredibly tolerant of my baby cousins tugging at her when they came along), and all-around probably the best dog I’ll ever have had.

I do have to acknowledge the one downside to Dachshunds (and every other small dog I've known, hello, Chihuahuas): they can be pretty noisy. The amount of barking seems to correlate to a dog's size. If it's small, it's going to bark a lot.

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