Rightpet

Rio

Blue Lacy

Overall satisfaction

5/5

Acquired: Breeder (professional)

Gender: Male

Training: Books

Quick to learn and train

4/5

Emotionally stable

5/5

Family oriented

2/5

Child safety

2/5

Safe with small pets

4/5

Doesn’t bark a lot

5/5

Health

5/5

Easy to groom

5/5

Great watch dog

3/5

Great guard dog

3/5

Wonderful dogs for the right people

By

United States

Posted January 23, 2015

Shortly after I met my soon to be husband, we discussed getting a puppy. He recommended I consider a blue lacy due to his previous experiences with them. I liked the type of dog he described: active, smart, loyal, hard working, and obedient. I also liked their look, like a sleek Weimrauner, gun metal grey, and about 50 lbs with white chest and toes (red and tricolor are also available). We brought our new puppy, Rio Brazos Blues, home soon thereafter at 8 weeks old. He has been with us ever since. At first and before we married, Rio stayed with me in my apartment. I needed to crate train him so I could easily housebreak him. While he crate trained easily, it took about six weeks to get him truly house broken. But since then he has had no problems and spends a good deal of time in our home, being out only when we are working with and feeding our livestock. I was careful to socialize him and accustom him to outside stimuli early to have a more balanced dog. This worked well for the most part. He is not immediately aggressive nor fearful with strangers. He is watchful and usually takes fifteen to thirty minutes to warm up to people. He adores me and loves my husband too. Lacies in general seem to prefer one person though, even while being good with other members of the household. I am thankful that in all situations he is incredibly obedient, something all of my family and friends frequently remark on. Lacies learn quickly and train easily but that training should be reinforced frequently, primarily because when they get excited, like many dogs, they are less likely to listen. As Rio has aged, this has been less of a problem. While Rio has excellent house manners, thanks in part to his early apartment experience, he has always required a lot of exercise. He needs to be able to run around or be walked at least an hour a day or he is likely to be hyper. Rio also has a strong working instinct. Unlike aussies and border collies, lacies work cattle and even hogs by catching them (getting in front and stopping or turning them) instead of driving them. They make excellent hog hunting dogs for this reason. They are also tough and require little grooming other than an occasional bath. They do shed quite a bit though so you may end up cleaning their hair off of furniture, your clothes, and the floor quite often. They are not hypoallergenic. Overall they are robust dogs though some care in feeding and worming is necessary. Always use a dog approved wormer and dog food, not human food. My lacy has been sensitive on these matters and is more likely to vomit if care is not taken in these matters. The only known genetic disease of lacies appears in the blue and tri dogs. This is known as color dilution alopecia where over time they may lose some hair. Blue great danes suffer from it as well. My dog is excellent with cats and other small animals but was also accustomed to them early. He does not always tolerate children well though I've heard of many lacies who can and do. This is likely because he has never been around them much. Lacies are excellent dogs but should be watched well in families with young children unless they have been raised with them from an early age. Lacies need space to move and lots of exercise. They also have strong working instincts so early training is a must. Thankfully they learn quickly and willingly.

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