Rightpet

Heppin

American Pit Bull Terrier Mix

Overall satisfaction

4.75/5

Acquired: Rescue / shelter organization

Gender: Female

Training: I haven't learned care / training techniques

Quick to learn and train

3/5

Emotionally stable

4/5

Family oriented

5/5

Child safety

2/5

Safe with small pets

5/5

Doesn’t bark a lot

5/5

Health

5/5

Easy to groom

5/5

Great watch dog

4/5

Great guard dog

2/5

Rescued and Forever Appreciative

By

United States

Posted November 22, 2015

Heppin (Swedish for "makes you happy") was rescued from a crack house back in January and none too soon. Her caretakers (if you really want to call it that) had impregnated her and planned to use her puppies as bait dogs.

The puppies were aborted at one point before the rescue team was able to get to her. We volunteered to foster her at our farm where we could provide training, socializing, and improve her experiences on life before finding her a forever home.

Well, at the two month mark, a family had finally displayed interest in adopting her after viewing her profile online....Needless to say, we couldn't give her up. She was too much of a sweetheart and molded into the family too perfectly.

Heppin is a little on the short side for a Pit Bull, though as many pitty lovers are aware, they range in all shapes and sizes. Heppin was slim-waisted, displayed fairly muscular arms & chest, and short but very floppy ears. She's ideal for anyone who wants a low maintenance grooming breed as she does not shed and is well behaved when it comes to nail clipping.

She is fairly lazy for a pit! If you're on the couch, she wants to be on the couch too, as close and cuddly as possible. She truly believes she is a lap dog and will make her way into folks' laps, seeming both regal & homely at the same time.

Food-wise, she is not aggressive and not nearly as food-focused as my other dogs (including a Golden Retriever mix and Black Lab mix). Because she's a bit of a couch potato though, she can easily put on weight.

Because she was fixed later in life, she seems a little more on edge around female dogs than males. Not that she tries anything sexual around anyone-no humping or flirting-but she seems to prefer males over females and has made a couple of ugly faces to my other girl. Not around food or toys, but over attention. She gets jealous on occasion if Sadie is obtaining attention and she isn't. Generally, she'll just squeeze her way in for the love. She doesn't want to get ugly unless she "has to."

One of Heppin's biggest issues is love nibbles which we have been trying to ween her from for months on end. She is very attached emotionally to the family so when we return from a day long trip or a 30 minute trip to the grocery store, she is overwhelmed with excitement at our arrival. She'll jump up and snatch onto the first body part she can get her mouth around. For me, it's usually the wrists. She doesn't comprehend that it's too rough. Even with the scolding, she's been stubborn with it. Almost like she can't control herself.

If you couldn't tell from my previous paragraph, Heppin also has separation anxiety. Even with 3 other dogs in the house to keep her company, Heppin is a bit of a wreck when the whole family has to leave. Thankfully, one of us is generally there- both of my parents are retired. We learned pretty quickly that she'll get into things and rip them apart if we're gone for a while- R.I.P remote, pillow, and laptop chord. If need be, we crate her, but that is on very rare occasion. She's less destructive now that she's older.

She's very well behaved in the car! She'll usually lay down in the backseat and not make a peep. Backseat cuddling is common when other passengers hop in.

Heppin is my little angel and a great representation of why pit bulls belong in the family room, not chained up in the backyard.

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