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Azawakh

Overall satisfaction

5/5

Acquired: Breeder (hobby breeder),
Breeder (professional),
Bred dog myself,
Worked with pet (didn’t own)

Gender: N/A

Training: Previous owner, I haven't learned care / training techniques, Attended conferences / shows, Books, Friends, I’ve taught bird care / training techniques

Quick to learn and train

5/5

Emotionally stable

N/A

Family oriented

5/5

Child safety

5/5

Safe with small pets

3/5

Doesn’t bark a lot

4/5

Health

5/5

Easy to groom

5/5

Great watch dog

5/5

Great guard dog

3/5

Azawakh: The Desert Sun Dog

By

California, United States

Posted October 9, 2012

A rare hound from the Sahel of West Africa, the Azawakh are like living art to me. Primarily a working dog trainer (for protection or police work, herding and field trial retriever), I live with a rather large population of these beautiful hounds.

The Azawakh hound fascinates me because they are complex. Physically, they are classified as belonging to the sight hound category, for show purposes. They are equipped with excellent running gear, which actually is evolved for heat dissipation - but can be useful for hunting and coursing. At heart the Azawakh are hounds, and they roo like one, too. The Azawakh are super intelligent, very loving and loyal to their family (or pack), but at the same time, can be highly suspicious of strangers. The Azawakh are extremely obedient, but you have to learn to read and interpret them accurately. You don't have to live with one to love one - you can enjoy their beauty depicted in abundant images accessible everywhere.

In their country of origin in West Africa, the Azawakh hounds live with the Tamasheq speaking nomads, who use them primarily as watch dogs for their camp, and have done so for millennium. The Azawakh have keen hearing and will also bark-alert at any threats to the livestock. They are prized by the nomads as companions. With the decrease of nomadism and the increased use of firearms, the Azawakh is not used much for hunting today, although historically, they were used for hunting gazelle.

6 members found this helpful