Rightpet

American Shorthair

Overall satisfaction

5/5

Acquired: Other (stray, given cat by friend etc.)

Gender: N/A

Appearance

5/5

Intelligence

5/5

Friendly with owners

5/5

Good with dogs

5/5

ActivityLevel

5/5

Appropriate vocalization

5/5

Playfulness

5/5

Healthiness

5/5

Easy to groom

5/5

Need for attention

4/5

My plentiful experience with having cats.

By

United States

Posted Aug 02, 2015

Before actually owning a cat myself, I lived with my parents and grandmother who had several cats while I was growing up. My parents finally got our first cat (who is now a senior) when I was 8 years old (I'm 23 now). Animals have different personalities just like people do. Out of the 4 cats I have had a hand in raising, they have all been very different in their personalities. My senior cat has always been shy and timid. She was never has been comfortable with strangers and often hides from people she doesn't know. She's also very quiet and rarely meows (unless she steals your socks, then she lets you know). In her old age she's not that playful as she once was. She's very mellow. The second cat I have ever owned was the first one I had ever owned as an adult and taken care of directly. He was very vocal and playful as a young adult cat. He was also very social and demanded attention from anyone he thought he could get it from. He was my baby, but unfortunately he crossed the rainbow bridge earlier this year. I was absolutely devastated. Now I currently own two 4 month old kittens who are the most rambunctious pair you could ever meet. Then again most kittens are like little race cars. They are such a join and also a big pain at times but I still love them nonetheless. One is a lot more vocal than the other, however not as much as my last cat. Only time will tell what their true personalities will be like when they get older. Overall I can tell you owning a cat is just like owning any other animal. It can be a joy and it can also be a pain. It's joyful when you get to see cute little furry faces waiting for you when you get home, and to snuggle with you at night. It's also a pain because like most animals, they require training, and a lot of care. Vet bills are no joke and can cost as much as any hospital bill for a person. Food can get expensive depending on the type of food and especially when they have special dietary needs. They also don't live nearly as long as humans and it's always heartbreaking when they go. Knowing all this though I am still an avid cat lover and will continue to own cats for probably the rest of my life no matter how much they break my heart when they cross that bridge.

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