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Cockatiel

Overall satisfaction

4/5

Acquired: Breeder (non-professional, hobby breeder)

Gender: Female

Appearance

4/5

Friendly with owner

3/5

Friendly with family

3/5

Trainability

2/5

ActivityLevel

2/5

Song-vocal quality

3/5

Mimics sounds-words

1/5

Health

5/5

Easy to feed

0/5

Easy to clean and maintain habitat

2/5

The quintessential first parrot

By

United States

Posted Jan 01, 2013

My husband adopted our hand-raised cockatiel once she was eating solid food. She has lots of personality but never warmed up to being the sort of cuddly companion bird many people hope for when they bring home a cockatiel. I have found this to be the case with other cockatiels I have owned or met. They can be slightly nippy and aggressive and prone to breeding season aggression as well as egg-related problems in females. Durga is a very independent bird who likes to intimidate everything with her wings outspread in a menacing fashion. She vocalizes a lot but doesn't sing - male 'tiels are typically more musical and more likely to mimic words or sounds, however sexing cockatiels depending on their age and coloration can be tricky. The best method for sexing 'tiels is by blood test which can be done at home with a mail away kit.

If you are looking for a more gentle, engaging small bird I would recommend parrotlets. Parrotlets are smaller and can be more expensive but they form attachments to their chosen humans very strongly. Durga lives with our rescued dove and could take or leave his companionship or the companionship of other birds or people.

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