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Cherry-headed Conure

Overall satisfaction

4/5

Acquired: Worked with pet (didn’t own)

Gender: Male

Appearance

4/5

Friendly with owner

5/5

Friendly with family

3/5

Trainability

3/5

ActivityLevel

4/5

Song-vocal quality

2/5

Mimics sounds-words

3/5

Health

5/5

Easy to feed

0/5

Easy to clean and maintain habitat

3/5

The Wild Parrots of Telegraph Hill

By

Ontario, Canada

Posted Aug 08, 2012

Cherry Headed Conures are easily confused with several other species, including the Mitred Conure and the Red Fronted Conure. Although not quite as common as some other Aratinga Conures such as the Sun and Jenday, it remains a popular pet largely due to it's outgoing, sociable personality. They are the starts of the documentary The Wild Parrots of Telegraph Hill, which follows just one of several well-established feral flocks of Cherry Headed Conures that can be found in a number of southern states as well as Hawaii, Mexico and even parts of Europe. They can be territorial, so it's a good idea to stick-train or teach them to come to the door so that the owner doesn't have to reach into the cage to retrieve them. Although they are not generally known for talking ability, many are likely to pick up a couple of words; be warned, however, that their natural call is raucous and abrasive to some - it's best to meet one in person to determine whether you'll be able to handle the noise before you make a lifetime commitment to one of these social butterflies.

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