Rightpet

Budgerigar

Overall satisfaction

4/5

Acquired: Breeder

Gender: Male

Appearance

2/5

Friendly with owner

3/5

Friendly with family

3/5

Trainability

3/5

ActivityLevel

3/5

Song-vocal quality

3/5

Mimics sounds-words

0/5

Health

3/5

Easy to feed

3/5

Easy to clean and maintain habitat

3/5

Glad to have owned them but wouldn't do it again

By

Australia

Posted Jun 04, 2016

When my sister and I were in primary school we had a budgie each. Mine was a blue male and hers was a green female.
My father made a cage for them out of a very old timber t.v. frame, filling the screen hole and the back with bird netting. We made a nesting box and looked after them, changing the paper in the bottom of the cage daily, replacing their seed and cleaning their water bowls.
They seemed contented and made pretty chirps and budgie noises all the time. We were able to pat them and handle them as they had been hand reared by the breeder.
Together, as they got older, the birds were happy in each others company. So happy that one day we discovered an egg in the nesting box. Then the girl budgie started to look sick. We took her to the vet but were told she was egg-bound. The egg she was trying to lay had gotten stuck and made her very sick. She didn't make it.
With his mate gone my budgie lost interest in food, was lethargic and stopped singing. Within two weeks, he had pined away, dying of a broken heart.

Budgies, like some other birds, make forever connections with mates. They can be fragile and susceptible to illness and injury with their delicate bones and fine feathers. They require attention and care on a daily basis.
My family did go on to have other birds, mostly rescuing wild fledglings that had fallen from their nests when too young to fly. I don't think I will own birds again.

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