Rightpet

Budgerigar

Overall satisfaction

1.25/5

Acquired: Breeder (non-professional, hobby breeder)

Gender: N/A

Appearance

5/5

Friendly with owner

0/5

Friendly with family

0/5

Trainability

0/5

ActivityLevel

5/5

Song-vocal quality

5/5

Mimics sounds-words

2/5

Health

3/5

Easy to feed

5/5

Easy to clean and maintain habitat

5/5

My Budgie's eggs got stolen and she died of heartbreak

By

Australia

Posted Apr 11, 2015

Budgies are said to be intelligent and friendly birds, but unfortunately I did not experience any of this when we owned them. To be honest, we were unable to do much of anything with our birds. We got them as adults and they were already flying away from humans, preferring the company of other birds. This shows that the age of the bird is something to think about and consider when you are looking to get a budgie. The younger they are, the more impressionable they are and the easier to train; males are typically easier to train than females, and are more likely to mimic noises and speech.
Whilst our birds – a male and a female – were already too old to bond with and train for the inexperienced bird owners we were at the time, we were still able to appreciate their enchanting sounds and chattering amongst each other.
Unfortunately even though we had a male and female, breeding only happened very few times and when it did the precious little eggs were taken by either snakes or mice. This is something to seriously safeguard against, especially if you are living on a rural property as we were. These were heartbreaking occurrences for us as the owners, however it appeared to be more so for our poor female budgies as after the second time it happened she died unexpectedly.
As at the time we were unsure of how to prevent such as occurrences we decided not to get another female budgie, but to instead get a Weiro. The two became the best of friends and shows that budgies are very much able to socialise and live comfortably in a cage with other birds.
As with any bird cage, the bigger the cage the better for them to have a more enjoyable life. Our cage was 5 foot high, just over a metre deep and 2 metres wide – this seemed to be an okay size for them, even when we got a second Weiro and two Quale’s to run around on the ground.
You need to ensure you have a cover for the cage at night, something I believe to be especially important if you live in a more rural area where there are more wild animals venturing out at night that could frighten the birds.
Bugdies need an environment which is not too hot and not too cold as either can be very uncomfortable for them. So it is essential that when looking to own a budgie you find a spot in your yard that maintains a comfortable temperate for the majority of the year and if it does get too hot or too cold, you might need to bring them inside away from the harsher weather.
They recommend cleaning the cage once a week, but I would say this is once a week AT LEAST. We would do little cleans every day when we fed and watered them and this not only meant we were spending more time in their cage with them, but they enjoyed having a clean and healthy environment. The more birds you have in a cage, the more mess being made and so obviously the more frequently the cage needs to be cleaned.
Whilst it was not my experience, when all the appropriate research is done and all the correct measures set in place, including the purchasing of the right budgie for you, they can be a rewarding and enjoyable pet, providing the family with much entertainment.

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