Rightpet

Unknown

Budgerigar

Overall satisfaction

0.75/5

Acquired: Pet store

Gender: Male

Appearance

4/5

Friendly with owner

3/5

Friendly with family

3/5

Trainability

0/5

ActivityLevel

4/5

Song-vocal quality

4/5

Mimics sounds-words

1/5

Health

4/5

Easy to feed

2/5

Easy to clean and maintain habitat

2/5

The Budgie With No Name

By

United Kingdom

Posted Apr 02, 2015

Since visiting this site I have been reminded of the many pets we have had down the years. In Scotland where I live there have been a number of fads for pets that lasted for years. One such fad in the early 60s was for keeping budgerigars. A lot of people owned a budgie as they were called. I thought they were compulsory until I was seventeen.

The most exciting thing ours ever did was fly up onto the curtain rail and refuse to come down; a sort of avian roof top prison protest. The rest of the time you had to make do with watching the small fluffy thing peck its bell or attack its reflection in the mirror.

My mother used to throw a tea towel over the cage to con the wee fella into thinking it was night and that it should therefore go to sleep. At times that was the only way to stop it singing. That bird used to radiate happiness.

You need a cage, obviously. And a water trough. A fragment of cuttle fish can be poked through the bars of the cage so they can sharpen their beaks on it (for the life of me, even now I cant think of any advantage to a budgie in having a sharp beak).

It is so long ago that I do not recall its name but knowing my mother’s penchant for a bet on the horses it was probably named after a Kentucky Derby winner.

A harmless and utterly boring pet to many people’s taste, a constant companion to other. You pays your money and you takes your chances.

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