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Panchito

Brown-throated Conure

Overall satisfaction

4.5/5

Acquired: Bred bird myself

Gender: Male

Appearance

4/5

Friendly with owner

5/5

Friendly with family

5/5

Trainability

4/5

ActivityLevel

5/5

Song-vocal quality

5/5

Mimics sounds-words

4/5

Health

5/5

Easy to feed

5/5

Easy to clean and maintain habitat

4/5

Panchito, my Brown throated Conure

By

Posted Feb 14, 2016

I’m not sure to remember how Panchito got to my home, but it was very pleasant to have him with the family. This type of Conure are really kind creatures. The thing I remember the most about him is about his sociability and well behavior with the family. He would always cheer you up at any moment with its joy and friendship. He learned a few words and he whistled some other things. People say they could learn to talk a lot, but he was more a whistler than a talker. He enjoyed to walk around the house and stay over your shoulder tinkling your ear and your hair. He always returned to his cage at night and stayed there.
They cares are simple and they can be easily fed. They are happy and well fed with most fruits and there is some specialized food that can be easily found at any pet store. You should be aware of their wings if you don’t want them to fly away if you want to let them get out of the cage to wander the house. We used to cut just a little the feathers at the tip of one of his wings so he could not fly. Their cleaning and the maintenance of their space shouldn’t be so difficult, you just have to clean their cage once in a while and use some paper on the bottom to change it every four days, but you should be aware when they are out of the cage because they can’t learn where to put their little gifts.
They could be really good companions if you want a small pet that could easily maintained.
Anyway, on the other hand, you should know they are banned for commercial use in some countries because they are protected against wildlife trafficking, you should be aware of obtaining them from professional breeders, this to avoid the contribution to the affection of the population of this species in their natural habitat.

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