Rightpet

American Singer Canary

Overall satisfaction

4/5

Acquired: Pet store

Gender: Male

Appearance

3/5

Friendly with owner

3/5

Friendly with family

2/5

Trainability

2/5

ActivityLevel

3/5

Song-vocal quality

5/5

Mimics sounds-words

0/5

Health

3/5

Easy to feed

5/5

Easy to clean and maintain habitat

3/5

lovely singers

By

United States

Posted Jun 14, 2014

I have had several canaries over the years, but the best singer was a plain, greenish brown one. He could produce an amazing range of beautiful tones: trills, slides, long notes, vibrations. He was a joy to listen to for years, although for the last year or so of his life he was not as vocal.

Canaries are birds for looking at and listening to, not playing with. None of mine ever enjoyed human contact although they generally were calm with me. Strangers would send them whizzing about the cage anxiously. They are fairly neat and easy to feed. I fed a range of foods, from canary seed to grass and greens to a special mix of seeds and grains that needed to be cooked, but it didn't seem to make much difference to the birds.

If you are mostly interested in a great singer (more than color or physical appearance), the best thing to do is visit a store or breeder who knows canaries. The best store I found would let me stand near the cages while they ran a vacuum cleaner nearby. I don't know why, but canaries seem to like to compete with the sound. Pick out the bird whose voice you like the best. You will be listening to that voice a lot, even when you might not want to (like first thing in the morning). Covering the cage helps to quiet them, but the least bit of light coming into the cage can set them off vocally. Males are the singers, of course. I usually had one canary at a time and they didn't seem to be lonely, but some people buy a pair for company.

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