Rightpet

Junior

African Grey Hornbill

Overall satisfaction

1.5/5

Acquired: Rescue / shelter organization

Gender: Male

Appearance

3/5

Friendly with owner

2/5

Friendly with family

1/5

Trainability

0/5

ActivityLevel

3/5

Song-vocal quality

4/5

Mimics sounds-words

0/5

Health

2/5

Easy to feed

5/5

Easy to clean and maintain habitat

4/5

Mockingbird-rescued

By

United States

Posted Jul 29, 2015

Living previously in Florida, we found a very young Mockingbird and a nest that had
fallen out of a tree which could not be re-installed. This left this fledgling Mockingbird on-the-ground, flightless and a victim of any nearby dog or cat, or
vehicle should it get onto the road. Accordingly we took this baby Mockingbird in
and put it into a roomy cardboard box (open at the top) and began feeding it raw hamburger meat, an occasional and available insects and quenched its thirst by
delivering water through an eye-dropper. A young bird requires a lot of feedings during the day, so Mom, my brothers and I took turns on this responsibility, although naturally Mom ended up providing the bulk of this young Mockingbird's needs. After a couple of months, this bird gained its feathers, its strength and
began exercising its wings and we gave it privileges to treat my brother's bedroom as its personal aerodrome as it experimented with flight. It of course
had bonded to Mom, and when we took it outside and released it, it flew
back to Mom, and this went on for its first few days of freedom. Mockingbirds provide jubilant songs to the Florida outdoors and are the State Bird of Florida.
While Mockingbirds are not suitable as pets, you will probably feel a contentedness should you need to rescue one. Baby birds can be put back into nests, however, if you see a nest has been damaged or destroyed, there's no
alternative to taking it in and feeding, sheltering and watering it, until it can make it on its own. Some shelters may not have the time to saving a small bird's life.

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