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Cope's Gray Tree Frog

Overall satisfaction

5/5

Acquired: Other

Gender: N/A

Appearance

3/5

Health

5/5

Activity level

3/5

Temperament

3/5

Visibility

5/5

Easy to handle

3/5

Easy To feed

5/5

Easy to clean and maintain habitat

5/5

Easy to provide environmental needs

5/5

Easy to provide habitat

5/5

Cope's Gray Tree Frog

By

United States

Posted Jul 25, 2015

I have had many tree frogs over the years. As with all of the other herps I've owned, they've all been tree frogs that were caught right in the area where I live.
Native tree frogs are so easy to take care of! Basically, all they need is an aquarium to live in, dechlorinated water in that aquarium, and food. The habitat I've kept them in has been one that has dirt in it, with some leaves, bark, small rocks, and a small white plastic dish, clean and filled with water, (the kind that comes from Hormel microwaved meals), that I call a "pond". The two most important things to remember when taking care of tree frogs are: make sure that there is always water in the "pond", and make sure to feed them at least three times a week; daily is better. And one needs to be aware of when they come out of hibernation, and start feeding them daily, taking the crickets out if they don't eat them, trying again the next day.
I really like keeping these little guys as pets. I think that they are absolutely adorable. They sound so cute when they sing! They usually do this right after one catches them; its their mating call. They generally hang out in the corner of the aquarium, up high. One can keep more than one at a time without any problems concerning overcrowding or territory. I have kept up to three with no problem. They eat crickets. I tend to dump a bunch in their house at once. They last for several days and keep them fed until I buy more.
It's best not to handle them, as they are excellent jumpers, and you probably don't want to be chasing a tree frog around the room. And, depending on where it might jump to, it could end up stuck somewhere, and that could be a very bad thing.
I enjoy having these little guys as pets because they are, as I said, so cute. They may not do a whole lot, but I just enjoy looking at them, and am fascinated by their ability to climb glass and to hang out in the corner for hours. I have loved having them as pets since I caught my first one on a flower pot on my front porch years ago. I don't see any drawbacks, at all, to owning a native tree frog. They are very easy to take care of, and are fun to watch. Just make sure to keep their house covered, so you don't have the fun of trying to capture an escaped tree frog!

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