Rightpet

American Bullfrog

Overall satisfaction

4.75/5

Acquired: Other

Gender: N/A

Appearance

3/5

Health

4/5

Activity level

3/5

Temperament

2/5

Visibility

3/5

Easy to handle

2/5

Easy To feed

5/5

Easy to clean and maintain habitat

5/5

Easy to provide environmental needs

5/5

Easy to provide habitat

5/5

American Bullfrog

By

Ohio, United States

Posted Jun 12, 2014

I had the fortunate experience of owning one of these enjoyable creatures for about six months before it (I was never sure about the gender) made it's unfortunate depart last summer. I obtained a reasonably-sized American Bullfrog pollywog from my sister-in-law who had saved it from being abused by my very young niece in her attempts to play with it.

I decided that it would make a wonderful pet and set up a habitat for it in a fifteen-gallon tank which included a dry section formed from a rock on one side with mud, moss, wild violets and native grasses. The rest of the tank, about two-thirds, was a water section with a thin layer of creek pebbles lining the bottom. It served as a fitting habitat for my little friend and was a fully-functioning ecosystem, requiring only a small addition of water every so often.

I fed it a diet of earth worms, which was very entertaining to watch--bullfrogs have a distinct style of hunting land-roving prey and "pouncing" on it. Because of the well-developed dry section, I was able to place an abundance of worms in the tank--five to ten at a time--which provided the little frog with food for a few weeks at a time. Whenever I noticed the worm-count becoming low (whenever I couldn't see them periodically emerging from their earthen homes), I placed a few more in.

I have found in my case that bullfrogs are not necessarily the most calm and friendly of pets, preferring not to be handled, but with more time and gentle dedication I believe that they could be taught to be more friendly. They are hardy pets and are very interesting to watch. They spend a lot of time hiding but are reasonably visible when you learn to spot them, which is a good natural perception-developing experience as well. My little frog was a joy to keep and I definitely would someday like to repeat the experience.

Unfortunately, my pet left me when I left it in the hands of a petsitter who didn't quite know how to care for it and accidentally placed chemical-laced potting soil in the water with some earth worms. *This is a major concern and I don't want to see this ever happen to anyone else's pet, so please be sure to keep a close eye on what enters the tank.*

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